A Healthy Prostate Strategy

November 04, 2010

Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer in America, affecting one in six men during their lifetimes.  The older a man is, the more likely he is to be diagnosed with prostate cancer. While only one in ten thousand men under the age of 40 will be diagnosed, that number rises to one in thirty-eight for ages 40 to 59, and skyrockets to one in fifteen for ages 60 to 69. Accepted and specific nutritional guidelines for preventing prostate cancer are sketchy and not universally accepted. However, two regional diets are known to be associated with longevity and reduced risks for prostate cancer: the traditional Japanese diet and a Southern Mediterranean diet. The Japanese diet is high in green tea, soy, vegetables, and fish. It is also low in calories and fat. The Mediterranean diet is high is fresh fruits and vegetables, garlic, tomatoes, red wine, olive oil, and fish. Both are low in red meat.  How can you incorporate aspects of these diets in your nutritional regimen?
  • Reduce animal fat in your diet. Studies indicate that excess fat, primarily red meat and high-fat dairy, stimulates growth in prostate cancer.
  • Avoid trans fatty acids, which are known to promote cancer growth.
  • Increase your fresh fish intake. Fish is high in the very beneficial alpha omega-3 fatty acids.  Try eating it poached, baked, or grilled rather than fried.
  • Increase your daily fresh fruit, herb, and vegetable consumption. In a recent study, men eating three servings of fruits and vegetables per day were 48 percent less likely to develop the disease.
  • Avoid high-calcium diets, which have been shown to stimulate prostate cancer growth.
  • Increase your natural vitamin C consumption by eating more citrus, berries, spinach, cantaloupe, sweet peppers, and mango.
  • Try drinking green tea several times each week.
  • Look for ways to add soy to your diet.  If you're not fond of tofu, try cooking with soy milk, or use a soy creamer in your morning coffee.
  • Avoid excess preserved, pickled, or salted foods.
  • Eat cruciferous vegetables such as cabbage, broccoli, and cauliflower. These veggies are important additions to your diet for their protection against cancer.
  • Don't forget tomatoes! Tomatoes and especially tomato products are very high in lycopene, a powerful anticancer substance.
Work towards prevention, but be prepared! Men over 50 should have yearly exams! Looking for more information on maintaning a healthy prostate?  New this month on Peter's Principles TV -- Prostate Health.  View episodes of Peter's Principles online and free!

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