Salmon - A Great Catch!

August 25, 2011

salmon Salmon is a popular addition to anyone's menu; it's rich flavor and versatility comes packed with omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3 fatty acids are necessary to our survival but are not manufactured by our bodies and must be obtained from food sources.  Omega-3-rich salmon fills the bill and more!
  • The omega-3 fat in salmon is associated with decreased risk of heart attack, stroke, heart arrhythmia, high blood pressure, and high triglycerides in the blood. A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that women who ate as little as one serving per week of omega-3 fish could reduce the risk of cardiac arrest by 50%. Japanese researchers found that people who ate fish every day lowered the risk of heart attack by 56% and heart attacks by 37% when compared to the risk for occasional fish eaters.
  • More than 50% of brain mass is made up of lipids, and over 70% of these are fatty acids that belong to the omega-3 group.  Omega-3 is associated with decreased risk of depression and hostility in some studies of younger people, and decreased risk of cognitive decline in older persons.
  • Recent studies indicate that omega-3 fatty acids decrease the severity of joint pain, making salmon a desirable addition to any nutritional regimen. Other studies show that omega-3 fatty acids may reduce the symptoms of inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Omega-3 has also been associated with decreased risk of macular degeneration and chronic dry eye. A recent study including up to 71,000 nurses looked at the links between dietary fat and rates of cataract surgery.  Researchers found that the 20 percent of nurses who consumed the most fish -  the greatest amount of omega-3 fatty acids - had a 12 percent lower risk of cataract surgery, compared with the 20 percent of nurses who consumed the least fish.
  • A diet rich in omega-3 fat is also associated with decreased risk for several types of cancer, including colorectal cancer, prostate cancer, and breast cancer. Cancer risk studies typically begin to show measurable benefits when fish rich in omega-3, such as salmon,  are consumed at least once per week.
Salmon is not only an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids, it is a very good source of  vitamin D, selenium, protein, niacin and vitamin B12 and is considered a good source of phosphorous, magnesium and vitamin B6.  Coming in at 367 calories per 6 oz serving, salmon is a light-weight meal with a serious punch!

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