Four Super Fall Foods

September 17, 2014

Days are becoming shorter and cooler, and the newly available local produce reminds us of how easily our eating habits align with the changing seasons. With a little forethought, we can keep fresh tasting vegetables in our menus all year long! These four fall superstars are important and healthy additions to your autumn menus ... and they're delicious! Apples
  • Research at the University of Quebec found that eating apples reduces cell damage because of the antioxidant "quercetin" which they contain!
  • Researchers at The Florida State University found that older women who ate apples everyday had 23% less bad cholesterol and 4% more good cholesterol after six months.
  • A large study involving researchers from the US, UK and Singapore that included 187,382 participants found that people who ate three servings per week of apples, grapes, raisins, blueberries or pears had a 7% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes compared to those who did not.
Brussels sprouts
  • A 2011 study published in the Journal of Food Science found that the compounds called glucosinolates and isothiocyanates  in Brussels sprouts can reduce your risk of cancer.
  • Brussels sprouts have greater total glucosinolate content than that found in greens, turnip greens, cabbage, kale, cauliflower, or broccoli.  Glucosinolates are important phytonutrients for our health because they are the chemical starting points for  cancer-protective substances.
Parsnips
  • Parsnips help regulate immune response. The compound falcarindiol (FAD), found in parsnips, has the ability to stop immune cells from reaching maturity. The ability to suppress the immune system gives parsnips great potential to be part of a new therapy for the treatment of autoimmune and allergic diseases.
  • Rich in vitamin C, parsnips help the body fight off infections by assisting antibacterial activity and regulating the immune system. It also plays a crucial role in the formation and integrity of skin.
Pears
  • Pears contain beta-carotene, lutein, and zeaxanthin, phytonutrients which provide antioxidant as well as anti-inflammatory benefits.
  • Pears are an excellent source of dietary fiber, which is good for the heart. Studies have shown that fiber can lower levels of bad cholesterol and reduce risk of stroke by up to 50 percent.
Including seasonal favorites in your menu help you maintain good eating habits all year long! Make healthy choices, you’ll feel better, and look better!

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